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Building OD education for the infinite world of tomorrow

 
 

Future of organisations, and implication for Od practitioners

 
 

Emerging Change at the BBC

In 1986 James Carse published Finite and Infinite Games: A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility, in which he fore warned the evolving nature of change will require change leaders and agents to work very differently.
He defined “ finite games” as closed systems, predictable, making sense to most because they tend to agree on the goal, the rules are relatively known, and the field of play has clear boundaries...


In the winter 2017 issue of the ODP, I presented the macro trends that are shaping how organisations are evolving and the implications for how OD practitioners and OD educators can be more “future ready.” The purpose was to invite responses and foster conversations about the future of organizations and OD. The purpose of this summary of the previous article is to highlight the shifts that are occuring in order to continue the conversation about future ready organizations, practices, and OD education....

 

"In this passionate presentation of what must be one of the world's largest inquiries, Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge incisively explores how AI values and principles were used during the contracting phase to demonstrate the power of the approach as part of the ownership management strategy, particularly by encouraging the client to participate fully in co-constructing the process of change" - B.J.Moher and S.P.Fitzgerald (Eds.). (2006) AI Practitioner May 2006.

Publication details: AI Practitioner, May 2006, pp27-33, www.aipractitioner.com

A fuller article describing the change process is in "The Handbook of Large Group Methods" edited by Barbara Benedict Bunker and Billie T. Alban, Jossey-Bass 2006.


THE SELF AS AN INSTRUMENT

A cornerstone for the future of OD

The promise of a bright future for OD lies in the hands of its torch bearers, OD consultants and their commitment to the continuous development of a competency that lies at the heart of their effectiveness - the self as instrument.

Drawing on an extensive literature review, Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge lays down the premise that this competency is a prime asset when it comes to building the kind of quality relationships with clients that are required to enhance organisational effectiveness.

The article builds upon the definitions of instrumentality developed by Warner Burke and Edwin Nevis to explore key practices in owning and refining the use of self.

Reflections by the author on work supervising and mentoring other OD consultants, highlight the necessity of employing these practices for high performance without high personal cost.

While perfect instrumentality can never be achieved, a collective journey towards it by OD consultants gives the author hope for a major impact in the field of OD.

First published in OD Network 'OD Practioner' Vol 33. No.3, 2001.  This version was updated in 2012.


AVOIDING DISCRIMINATION IN COMPETENCY DESIGN

The business case

Competency design has become a core business strategy. This article argues that incorporating the principles of equality and diversity in competency frameworks is critical, not only to prevent these frameworks becoming a tool of discrimination but also from a strategic business perspective.

In this article Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge draws on research and her own experience of working with companies on incorporating equality and diversity principles into competency frameworks. Examples of behavioural indicators that explicitly incorporate principles of equality and diversity are presented along with suggestions for how existing frameworks might be modified and new frameworks developed.

Publication details: Competency & Emotional Intelligence, vol.7, no.3, 2000, pp37-41.

This article also features in "The IRS Handbook on Competencies: Law and Practice", edited by Neil Rankin. Eclipse, London: 2001.


GLOBAL DIVERSITY & INCLUSION BENCHMARKS

Standards for Organisations Around the World

We offer the Global Diversity & Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World (GDIB) to support organizations globally in the development and implementation of Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) best practices.
The GDIB helps organizations:
• Realize the depth, breadth, and integrated scope of D&I practices; 
• Assess the current state of D&I;
• Determine strategy, and;
• Measure progress in managing diversity and fostering inclusion.

Diversity and Inclusion has emerged as a worldwide practice that is critical to an organization’s success. As with other disciplines, such as quality and safety, standards are needed to establish criteria by which to measure and monitor progress.

This Tenth Anniversary edition—the fourth GDIB—updates the previous editions published in 2006, 2011, and 2014. No doubt in the future there will be ongoing modifications where new best practices are identified and current ones become less significant.

Julie O’Mara and Alan Richter. All rights reserved. www.diversitycollegium.org


A SELF-HELP APPROACH TO REALISING CORPORATE STRATEGY

Article based on an interview with Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge

Because it involves internal stakeholders, Organisation Development differs from a traditional consultancy process. It not only develops the capacity for enhanced performance, it also encourages learning. Reflecting on over 20 years of research, observation and experience in OD, Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge highlights the benefits of this collaborative process and identifies the required roles and competencies of its practitioners for enhanced organisational effectiveness.

Publication details: research@roffeypark, Issue 5, March 2002, www.roffeypark.com


OD IN FOCUS

Article based on an interview with Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge

Because it involves internal stakeholders, Organisation Development differs from a traditional consultancy process. It not only develops the capacity for enhanced performance, it also encourages learning. Reflecting on over 20 years of research, observation and experience in OD, Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge highlights the benefits of this collaborative process and identifies the required roles and competencies of its practitioners for enhanced organisational effectiveness.

Publication details: research@roffeypark, Issue 5, March 2002, www.roffeypark.com


OD - What's in a name?

Linda Holbeche and Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge

Organisational development has a vital role to play in today’s competitive, turbulent and constantly changing world in building healthy and productive organisations, argue Linda Holbeche, CIPD Director of Research and Practice, and Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge, a leading thinker on organisational change. 


“ May I send you my best wish in the beginning of the new year – May 2017 be a very blessed year and you will be marked by an abundance of inner peace for the new year regardless of what the professional and personal life journey will be.    The world is changing, we are also asked to evolve and adapt while holding on to our core strength and identity.   May I share with you this article which just came  off the press this week so to give some context as well as some encouragement to you to think what kind of desirable future you and others yearn for and want to create..   All the best   Mee Yan “

The Future of Organizations and the Implication for OD practitioners